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Benefits of Spring Raking:

Achy elbows, sore biceps, and stiff lower back! These are all common side effects of manual spring lawn raking. Is it all worth it? YES! After a long dormant winter your lawn has been compacted by snow and ice. This compaction means that air flow is restricted from moving throughout your lawn and this causes mold spores and disease which can stunt spring green up and lead to even greater long term issues. A light raking (not trying to remove too much grass) will help to fluff up your lawn and encourage air flow between the blades of grass. This air flow along with a spring fertilizer application will encourage your lawn to wake up quickly and thicken up so that when those pesky dandelions start to POP, your lawn will naturally be able to fend them off by not allowing them to take root in your turf.

How to Rake the Lawn Properly:

When raking the lawn, the key is to raise the grass from a flat position to a standing position. Do not try to rake the lawn with too much force that you pull any of the healthy grass (green grass) out of the soil. You should however, try to pull up some of the dead grass (yellow grass that is not rooted in the soil) and debris (leaves/twigs/garbage) because this debris contains mold spores and the dead grass will block water and nutrients from getting into the soil. Once you rake the dead grass up and the debris you should discard it.

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